Start Vega banjo dating

Vega banjo dating

I have also included a page on identifying unmarked banjos, for those who have an instrument of unknown origin. Dobson "Victor-Regal" 5-string banjo, Circa 1880's Fairbanks & Cole "Clipper" 5-string banjo, S/N 1700, Circa 1881 Fairbanks & Cole 5-string banjo, S/N 4022, Circa 1884 Fairbanks & Cole "Imperial" 5-string banjo, S/N 6780, Circa 1885 Fairbanks & Cole piccolo 5-string banjo, S/N 6870, Circa 1885 Fairbanks & Cole "Acme" 5-string banjo, S/N 7300, Circa 1887 Fairbanks & Cole 5-string banjo, S/N 7375, Circa 1887 Fairbanks & Cole Imperial 5-string banjo S/N 7663, Circa 1887 Fairbanks & Cole "Imperial" 5-string banjo, S/N 8246, Circa 1888 Fairbanks & Cole "Expert" 5-string banjo S/N 8600, Circa 1888 Fairbanks & Cole "Imperial" 5-string banjo, S/N 8654, Circa 1888 A. Fairbanks "Electric" 5-string banjo, S/N 1147, Circa 1891 A. Fairbanks "Electric" 5-string banjo, S/N 2011, Circa 1892 A. Fairbanks "Curtis Electric" 5-string banjo, S/N 2370, Circa 1892 A. Fairbanks "Electric" 5-string banjorine, S/N 3693, Circa 1893 A.

I have recently added a page on Fairbanks/Vega engraved inlay evolution for those interested in how this particular art form developed over the years and through the transition from Fairbanks to Vega ownership.

Their Boston factories produced some of the finest instruments available, and in large quantities; even Vega’s lower-priced models are highly respected by players today.

However, in the mid 1930s, the company underwent a significant shift away from banjos and began concentrating on guitars.

The Vega Pete Seeger model 5-string banjo came into being during the 1950s as a result of requests that the Vega Company received for an extended-neck banjo like the one Pete Seeger played.